The Basics Of How To Grow An Organic GardenAugust 4, 2017August 4, 2017admin
To be successful in organic gardening, you need patience and persistence. A green thumb also helps considerably. The idea here is to grow healthy, great-tasting food bereft of pesticides, herbicides and other unnatural chemical enhancers. This seems to be easier said than done, though, right? If you want to have the most professional gardening skills you can, read the tips in this article.
When starting your organic garden, a great tip is to figure out which vegetables you should pick to plant in your garden. Some vegetables are better suited for home germination than others are. Some great vegetables to consider planting include broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, lettuce, peppers, onions, tomatoes, basil, and more.
Making your own compost for organic gardening is extremely simple and easy to do. It provides soil of gardens with rich nutrients and keeps soil cool during summer months. You can use kitchen waste, sawdust, aquarium water, coffee grounds, tea leaves, rabbit or hamster droppings, a thin layer of lawn clippings, spices and eggshells in your compost. Supplement with organic liquid fertilizer for an extra growth burst.
Use companion plants. Companion planting is the pairing of plants within your vegetable garden, such as planting cabbage with tomatoes. Companion planting helps reduce the problems with insect pests, as it attracts natural pest-controlling wildlife. Companion planting is also a better use of the space in your garden, since you basically have two plants in the same plot.
Perennial gardens should be prepared easily and quickly in the ground. Take your spade and work up a thin layer of soil. Turn that soil over, then spread a few inches of wood chips on the newly turned area. Let this sit for a couple weeks, next dig into it to plant your new plants.
If you don’t have the space to have an actual garden in the ground, it’s perfectly acceptable to have an organic garden in containers. There are only a few root vegetables like asparagus that won’t grow well in containers, so feel free to explore. Containers are perfect to grow organic tomatoes, green beans, green onions and many other organic vegetables.
Instead of pulling weeds, turn them into nourishment for your garden. Some weeds, like Lamium or Chickweed, are tough to remove one at a time. Instead, using a sharp shovel or spade, cut under the weeds and turn them over, making sure to bury all of the leaves. The weeds will rot, providing the soil with nourishment like composting.
Utilize frost covers for your plants when it gets cold. Frost may cause tiny ice crystals to form in your plant and shred the natural, soft flesh of the plant. Milk jug containers and other plastics can help assist you in making a closed environment around your plant. Ideally you want to protect your plant from being exposed to the cold outside air.
Location is very important to organic gardening. Your garden should be in an area that will get at least ten hours of sunlight during the summer. Prior to starting your garden, make sure that your location does not have any large obstructions that will cast shadows and block the sun. Plants need an adequate amount of sunlight to live.
Any organic gardening project is immediately susceptible to fungal diseases that can rot and ruin your seeds or seedlings before they even have a chance to grow. In order to prevent this, you should use sphagnum moss which acts as a natural fungicide. When your seeds are planted into the soil, apply the moss immediately after planting. On the other hand, if your seeds are exposed to sunlight, you should apply the moss first, and then deposit the seeds on the moss. You only need to use a sprinkle of moss.
To succeed at a nature based hobby like organic gardening, you need a little hard work and a whole lot of patience. However, the tastiness of the produce you grow will be a reward in itself. Through the careful application of this advice and with time and effort, you will be able to call yourself a successful organic gardener.